Top Four Excalibur timepieces by Roger Dubuis

  • Roger Dubuis Excalibur collection

Since its inception in 1995, Roger Dubuis has excelled over the past two decades to become one of the most vaunted marquees in haute horlogerie. Most inimitably, all the timepieces of Roger Dubuis have received the Seal of Geneva, a stringent guarantee of origin, tradition, resilience and precision. While the diligent Genevan manufacture has garnered immense acclaim through its classic Hommage collection and its Velvet collection dedicated to the fairer sex, it was the chance that Roger Dubuis took with the Excalibur collection that found the brand its grandest niche. Here are the top four Excalibur pieces by the brand.

Roger Dubuis

1. Excalibur 45 Skeleton Double Flying Tourbillon

The resounding success of the Excalibur collection prompted Roger Dubuis to reiterate its young starlet in a variety of precious metals, including decadent haute joaillerie variants. Indefatigably devoted to innovation and artistry, Roger Dubuis would soon after reveal a new technical landmark: the Excalibur 45 Skeleton Double Flying Tourbillon. An innovation where function precedes aesthetics, the tourbillon is meant to negate the effects of gravity on a watch’s timekeeping precision. Wielding two ceaselessly labouring escapements aligned at a precise angle, the 45-mm Skeleton Double Flying Tourbillon nullifies the hindrance of gravity along two axes, ensuring that its wearer is told the accurate time regardless of which way this watch faces. The timepiece features a RD01SQ movement and boasts a power reserve of 50 hours.

2. Excalibur Spider Skeleton Double Tourbillon

Roger Dubuis’ strong affinity for powerful cars eventually led to its mighty Excalibur Spider Skeleton Double Tourbillon taking on a sporty yet no less opulent visage. Robed in a roaring coat of racy colours, the Excalibur Spider Skeleton Double Tourbillon interprets Roger Dubuis’ flagship in titanium and black DLC (diamond-like carbon) titanium. Accents of red aluminium complementing blackened, matt and polished surfaces evoke within this timepiece the fire of championship racing, while its dial and robust case take on a visage inspired by speedometers of sports cars. Limited to 188 pieces and fastened to the wrist by a hardy rubber strap, the Excalibur Spider Skeleton Double Tourbillon is water-resistant to a depth of 50m, and like the Excalibur 45 Skeleton Double Flying Tourbillon, is driven by the RD01SQ movement and stores 50 hours of reserve power.

3. Excalibur 42 Skeleton Flying Tourbillon

Through the release of the first Excalibur 42 Skeleton Flying Tourbillon, Roger Dubuis discovered the uncanny allure of its fleeting escapements and lavishly embellished openwork movements. Delicately skeletonised, then snailed and polished by hand, the frame of its RD505SQ calibre also gained much popularity over the years due to its striking star-shaped appearance. Besides elongated Roman numerals and uniquely bevelled bezels on the 42-mm timepiece, the modus operandi of Roger Dubuis’s Excalibur family are its flying tourbillon and star bridge – celebrations of gorgeously precise engineering that birthed a line of instantly recognisable timepieces. Five models in pink or white gold are available, each with a power reserve of 60 hours.

4. Excalibur Automatic Skeleton Carbon

Last year, Roger Dubuis unveiled the Excalibur Automatic Skeleton, a well-received reference that spurred the brand to release a high-tech update this year. The Excalibur Automatic Skeleton Carbon comes with a new case in carbon fibre sheet moulding compound (SMC), a composite material that’s twice as light and hard as steel. Within this unique case, everything familiar in the original Excalibur remains. The RD820SQ calibre powering the timepiece is skeletonised to showcase its mechanical whirring to the best effect. Taking centrestage on the face is Roger Dubuis’ signature star motif with four of its points aligned with hour markers one, three, five and seven to direct the eye and improve legibility on a busy dial.

Share on

Published 28th September 2016
×